Picard & Cie FAQ

Question: Is there special care I should give to my Picard & Cie case, bracelet, or strap?

Answer: Metal bracelets should be washed carefully in water. If really dirty, use a soft toothbrush with soap and water to brush away the dirt. Finally, rinse with water and dry carefully with a soft cloth. If your watch is not water resistant, be careful not to get water on the case. Cases should be wiped gently with a slightly moistened soft cloth and then dried carefully.

Leather straps should be slightly loosened in the summer, when they may absorb perspiration. A tight strap not only prevents the passage of air over the strap undersurface but can also cause a perspiration rash on the wrist. If the strap ever becomes wet with perspiration, wipe it dry with a soft cloth. When you take off your watch, leave it in a well-ventilated spot. Never put it in a sealed container when it is still damp with perspiration. Avoid leaving your watch in direct sunlight. The strap color may fade.

Question: What special care should I give my Picard & Cie watch?

Answer: Shocks: Your watch is a precision measuring instrument. Treat it carefully, and it will serve you well. Avoid undue shocks (such as dropping on hard surfaces). The normal shocks caused by sports like tennis or golf present no serious threat.
Perspiration: You should aim to protect your watch from heavy perspiration. Please remember to wipe it dry as soon as conveniently possible.

Temperature Extremes: Quartz watches are much less affected by extremes of temperature than mechanical watches, and are designed to keep good time if worn on the wrist for eight hours a day with ambient temperatures between -10°C and +35°C. If removed completely from the wrist, your watch may lose time during the winter, but will return to normal accuracy as soon as you start wearing it again.
If your watch is stored at temperatures outside the normal range (as low as -10°C or as high as +60°C) the electronic components may cease to function normally.

Battery life can be significantly reduced at high temperatures (above 40°C), and battery fluid may even leak out.
Chemicals: Chemical substances, gases, mercury, etc., may change the color of cases, bracelets and straps. Mercury (for instance, from a broken thermometer) can cause particularly unsightly grey discoloration of gold plating.

Question: How does magnetism affect my Picard & Cie quartz watch?

Answer: Magnetism might affect analogue watches, which use a tiny electric motor to turn the hands. Powerful magnetism can affect the performance of this motor.

The good news is that although analogue watches may gain time, lose time, or even stop under the influence of powerful magnetic fields, they will usually return to normal time-keeping as soon as they leave the source of magnetism. (You may need to reset your watch, of course.)

Avoid putting your watch near medical equipment, headphones, loudspeakers, or refrigerator door magnets. Electric mixers and blenders and a wide range of other electrical equipment may also have strong enough magnetism to affect timekeeping.

Question: What is a subdial?

Answer: A subdial, or subsidiary dial, is a small dial placed inside the main dial on a watch face. Watches can have as many as four of them. Subdials, also called auxiliary dials, give information not provided by the main watch dial. They are common features of multifunction watches such as chronographs, alarm watches, dual-time-zone watches and calendar watches.

Question: How can you tell what a subdial is used for?

Answer: It's not as complicated as it seems. If a subdial has a 60 at the top, it's probably a continuously running seconds hand (if the watch is working, this hand will be moving). But a few subdials with 60 at the top are actually 60-minute counters. If the subdial has a 30 at the top, it’s most likely a 30-minute counter. If it has a 12 at the top, it's probably a 12-hour counter (although if the watch is a dual-time-zone model, it’s probably a second-time-zone indicator). If it has a 10 at the top, it probably measures 1/10th of a second. Date subdials have a 31 at the top for the maximum number of days in a month. Moon phase subdials are obvious - they have a picture of a moon showing through the aperture - as are month and day-of-the-week subdials, which are labeled either Jan. through Dec. or Sun. through Sat.

Question: What are Swarovski crystals?

Answer: Swarovski is the brand name for a range of cut crystal and related luxury products produced by Swarovski AG of Wattens, Austria. The company is split into two major industry areas, the Swarovski Kristall business unit that primarily works with luxury items and design crystals and the Tyrolit Schleifmittel business unit that manufactures related tooling and machinery. The Swarovski Crystal range includes crystal glass sculptures and miniatures, jewelry and couture, home decor, and chandeliers.

Question: How does “IP” or ion plating work?

Answer: Ion plating is a physical vapor deposition (PVD) process that is sometimes called ion assisted deposition (IAD) or ion vapor deposition (IVD) and is a version of vacuum deposition. Ion plating utilizes concurrent or periodic bombardment of the substrate and depositing film by atomic-sized energetic particles. Bombardment prior to deposition is used to sputter clean the substrate surface. During deposition the bombardment is used to modify and control the properties of the depositing film. It is important that the bombardment be continuous between the cleaning and the deposition portions of the process to maintain an atomically clean interface.

In ion plating the energy, flux and mass of the bombarding species along with the ratio of bombarding particles to depositing particles are important processing variables. The depositing material may be vaporized either by evaporation, sputtering (bias sputtering), arc vaporization or by decomposition of a chemical vapor precursor chemical vapor deposition - CVD. The energetic particles used for bombardment are usually ions of an inert or reactive gas, or, in some cases, ions of the condensing film material (“film ions”). Ion plating can be done in a plasma environment where ions for bombardment are extracted from the plasma or it may be done in avacuum environment where ions for bombardment are formed in a separate ion gun. The latter ion plating configuration is often called Ion Beam Assisted Deposition (IBAD). By using a reactive gas or vapor in the plasma, films of compound materials can be deposited.

Ion plating is used to deposit hard coatings of compound materials on tools, adherent metal coatings, optical coatings with high densities, and conformal coatings on complex surfaces.

Question: What does it mean when Picard & Cie watches are water resistant?

Answer:

ATM METERS FEET USAGE
3 30 100 Suitable for everyday use. Splash/rain resistant. NOT suitable for showering, bathing, swimming, snorkeling, water related activities.
5 50 165 Suitable for swimming, white water rafting, non-snorkeling water related activities.
10 100 330 Suitable for recreational surfing, swimming, snorkeling, sailing and water sports.
15 150 500 Suitable for recreational surfing, swimming, snorkeling, sailing and water sports.
20 200 660 Suitable for professional marine activity and serious surface water sports.
30 300 990 Suitable for professional diving.

Water Resistant is a common mark stamped on the back of wrist watches to indicate how well a watch is sealed against the ingress of water. It is usually accompanied by an indication of the static test pressure that samples of newly manufactured watches were exposed to in a leakage test.
An indication of the test pressure in terms of water depth does not mean a water resistant watch was designed for repeated long-term use in such water depths. For example, a watch marked 30 meters water resistant cannot be expected to withstand activity for longer time periods in a swimming pool, let alone continue to function at 30 meters under water. This is because the test is conducted only once using static pressure on a sample of newly-manufactured watches. The test for qualifying a diving watch for repeated usage in a given depth includes safety margins to take factors into account like ageing of the seals, the properties of water and seawater, rapidly changing water pressure and temperature, as well as dynamic mechanical stresses encountered by a watch. Also every diving watch has to be tested for water resistance or water-tightness and resistance at a water overpressure as it is officially defined.